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L'Homme Moïse et la religion monothéiste: Trois études by Sigmund Freud

By Sigmund Freud

« Une culture dont l. a. transmission ne serait fondée que sur une verbal exchange ne pourrait engendrer le caractère de contrainte qui ressortit aux phénomènes religieux. On l’écouterait, los angeles jugerait, au besoin on l. a. refuserait comme toute autre nouvelle venue de l’extérieur, elle n’atteindrait jamais au privilège d’être affranchie de los angeles contrainte de l. a. pensée logique. Il faut d’abord qu’elle ait vécu entièrement le destin du refoulement, l’état de séjournement dans l’inconscient, avant de pouvoir déployer à son retour des effets aussi puissants, forcer les plenty à tomber sous son emprise fascinante, comme nous l’avons vu avec étonnement, et sans comprendre jusqu’à présent, dans los angeles culture religieuse. Et cette réflexion pèse assez lourd dans l. a. stability pour nous faire croire que les choses se sont effectivement produites ainsi que nous nous sommes efforcés de le décrire, ou à tout le moins de façon analogue. »

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L'Homme Moïse et la religion monothéiste: Trois études

« Une culture dont los angeles transmission ne serait fondée que sur une conversation ne pourrait engendrer le caractère de contrainte qui ressortit aux phénomènes religieux. On l’écouterait, los angeles jugerait, au besoin on los angeles refuserait comme toute autre nouvelle venue de l’extérieur, elle n’atteindrait jamais au privilège d’être affranchie de los angeles contrainte de l. a. pensée logique.

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Extra info for L'Homme Moïse et la religion monothéiste: Trois études

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2 On Psychoanalysis and the Question of Nondefensive Religion Joseph H. Smith A ny attem pt to speak w ithout speaking any particular lan­ guage is not more hopeless than the attem pt to have a religion that shall be no religion in particular. . Thus every living and healthy religion has a m arked idiosyncracy. Its poiver consists in its special a nd surprising message and in the bias which that revelation gives to life. The vistas it opens and the mysteries it propounds are another world to live in; and a n ­ other world to live in — whether we expect ever to pass wholly over into it or not— is what we mean by having a religion.

Smith for their help in writing this essay. References Decartes, Rene. M editations on First Pbilosopby, 1:144—49. In The Philo­ sophical Works o f Descartes. Translated by Elizabeth Haldane and G. R. T. Ross. New York: Dover Publications, 1955. Gadamer, Hans-Georg. “Replik zu Hermeneutik und Ideologiekritik. ” In Gesam melte Werke, 2 :2 5 1 -7 5 . Tubingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1986. Holenstein, Elmar. ” Studia Pbilosopbica 46 (1987): 145—63HusserL, Edmund. Logical Investigations. Translated by John N.

Although psychoanalysis involves conversation and dialogue, its core lies in the transference that occurs between patient and analyst. This transference is substantially preverbal. The verbal dimension is essen­ tial to transference, but it lies on the surface. Transference is the re­ working of affective attitudes and interactions that have been inter­ nalized by the patient; in analysis the patient is to reexternalize these interactions and attitudes, to direct them toward the analyst, who will respond in such a way as to help the patient to untangle appropriate and inappropriate feelings (Loewald 1980, 259—60, 309—11, 335).

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